Sessions

Responding to this year’s theme, UNCHARTED WATERS, we have a roster of excellent speakers from both within and outside of the arts, exploring what it means to be a cultural sector fundraiser in uncertain times. These include fundraising in the regions, moving into leadership, prospecting for major donors and developing legacy fundraising programmes. At a more landscape level, we have sessions on the climate crisis, diminishing funding, generational change, greater awakening about unconscious bias, and our changing relationship with the rest of the world.

Bookended by the Opening and Closing Plenaries, there are four breakout slots across the day with 18 sessions to choose from, split under three strands:

1. PORTRAIT This track will teach delegates how to swim rather than sink when wading in uncharted waters. Sessions will cover how to improve personal health, wellbeing and work-life balance, and how to master ‘captaining your own ship’. We are looking for sessions that are honest and explore what to do when things go wrong, as well as right.

2. LANDSCAPE This track will look at how you navigate the shifting tides of fundraising. Sessions will cover emerging trends and approaches across all areas of giving and question how we diversify where our support comes from.

3. PRACTICAL This track will give delegates the tools they need to build a bigger boat. Sessions will cover practical and applicable fundraising skills, tools and methods. 

Reflecting our partnership with Young Arts Fundraisers and Arts Council England, sessions throughout the programme are designed with early career, regionally based and solus fundraisers in mind.

Programme 

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09:00 REGISTRATION, COFFEE AND NETWORKING

09:30 CULTURAL FUNDRAISING DECLARES CLIMATE EMERGENCY OPENING PLENARY

Chair: Dan Fletcher, Director (Fundraising), Moore Kingston Smith

Sufina Ahmad, Director, John Ellerman Foundation

Chris Till, Deputy Director of Fundraising, Greenpeace

Penne Wallis, Business Development Manager, ClientEarth

This decade is a critical ten years to tackle the climate crisis. While Cultural Sector organisations are slowly responding and changing behaviour, it is important for fundraisers to also examine what needs to change in their profession and practice. This plenary session will showcase examples of how we can ensure that cultural fundraising declares emergency.

10:30 FIRST BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Track

Session

Speakers

PORTRAIT

National Dining Rooms

CREATING A NURTURING & EMPOWERING WORKPLACE

As a sector we often have few resources to spare on the recruitment and development of our fundraisers - whether medium to large-sized organisations with fundraising teams or small organisations with a lone fundraising role. When we can’t meet the development or support expectations of our teams, there is a cost, both for the organisation and the individuals, impacting performance and wellbeing. We will explore some of the strategies available to organisations and individuals to encourage longer-term, healthier relationships between fundraisers and their organisations, using the Employee Lifecycle model and research on employee engagement.

Adam Cooper, Executive Director, Invisible Dust    

Deborah Myers, Director of Development, Science Museum Group

LANDSCAPE

Wilkins Boardroom

SO MUCH MORE THAN AN ARTS CENTRE? LOOKING AT THE FUNDING LANDSCAPE FROM A SMALL, RURAL BASED CENTRE TO A NATIONAL CONSORTIUM. IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RAISE: ARTS, CULTURE & HERITAGE

This session will explore the contrasts and common themes in regional fundraising between The Courtyard, Hereford and Future Arts Centre (a group of UK based art centres). No matter the scale of your operation, you will come away with useful ideas to develop your corporate fundraising and wider income streams. Come and hear from two experienced fundraisers operating in very different environments and learn from their honest assessments and insights.

Clare Wichbold MBE, Fundraising Manager (Trusts and Foundations), The Courtyard Centre for the Arts

Louise Kelly, Senior Consultant, Impact Fundraising

PRACTICAL

Lecture Theatre

PROSPECTING FOR MAJOR DONORS: THERE'S MORE TO RESEARCH THAN SITTING AT A DESK 

The demand for new prospects is endless. While desk research is an essential part of the prospecting process, how can we make the most of desk research and build on it by getting out and prospecting in person? In this session we will look at:
• Understanding your potential prospect pool
• Defining the research brief
• Understanding warm prospects
• Using desk research for cold prospecting
• Transitioning a research programme from being desk-based to combining desk research with face to face prospecting.
We will explore techniques such as prospecting interviews and groups to see how these can helpfully complement what’s done in the office to make the most of networks organisation’s to enhance your prospecting.

Andrew Thomas, Chief Executive, Charity Consultants Ltd & Founder Prospecting for Gold Ltd

PRACTICAL

Former Viewing Room

RECRUITING & WORKING WITH TRUSTEES & SENIOR VOLUNTEERS

An introduction into how to recruit, induct and utilise charity trustees and senior volunteers. In the first half we will take you through our experiences and top tips for diversifying and recruiting new trustees – including how we learnt from our mistakes. Following this, we will expand on our experiences of working with senior volunteers and trustees that are already connected with your charity. How can you utilise them better? What has worked and hasn’t worked in our experience. There will be time for discussion and questions at the end.

Donmar Warehouse

Becky Sharp, Fundraising & Development Manager, Wessex Museums

Silvia Melchior, Director of Development

Anh Nguyen, Director of Development, National Gallery

PRACTICAL

Conference Room 1

FOUR REASONS YOUR PROPOSAL WAS REJECTED... AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

Did you know that as many as 85% of grant proposals get rejected before they get anywhere near the trustees? While some are quite hard to reject, many are far too easy to file away in the recycling bin. In 2018 I helped set up a Foundation for a one-off funding round. Real organisations submitted real proposals to ask for real money for real projects. During this session, I will share four important lessons I learned from spending four weeks in the under-appreciated role of the Grant Manager. The four lessons are based on four fatal mistakes that many fundraisers make when writing trust proposals. We will explore what each mistake looks like in the context of a trust proposal, and set out top tips for avoiding these mistakes in the future. Whether you are new Trust fundraising or have been doing it your whole career there will be something you can take away from this session to improve your proposal writing. After this session you will view the application process in a whole new light and be better placed for ensuring your proposal is a winner, not a binner.

David Burgess, Director, Apollo Fundraising


11:30 MORNING BREAK

12:00 SECOND BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Track

Session

Speakers

PORTRAIT

Former Viewing Room

WELLBEING IN THE WORKPLACE: PRACTICAL ADVICE ON HOW TO BOOST YOURS & THE WELLBEING OF THOSE AROUND YOU

This interactive session will look at the causes of "un-wellbeing" in the sector; at what resilience means and how it can help in some of those instances, and will draw on a range of perspectives and share honest experiences from leaders in the field who have survived and been successful under high levels of workplace pressure. You’ll leave with a toolkit of ideas for boosting your resilience to take back to the workplace.

Claire Warner, Consultant, Trainer & Coach

Emma J Leaver, Senior Special Events Manager, Breast Cancer Haven

Francesca Hewitt, Director, Philanthropy Company

LANDSCAPE

Lecture Theatre

CULTURE-LED REGENERATION OUTSIDE LONDON, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RAISE: ARTS, CULTURE & HERITAGE

In towns and cities across the country, partners are coming together to use cultural activity as an effective driver of social and economic change. This session will draw on two inspiring case studies from projects outside London, which are at very different stages and in different parts of the country, to identify the essential elements for catalysing regeneration through culture.

As well as an overview of the national context, the session will focus on key themes to provide you with the ingredients for fundraising success, and practical advice on how to kick-start cultural regeneration in regional contexts across the UK. There will also be plenty of time to ask questions and share experiences from your own projects.

Bryony Hope, Fundraising Manager, Hampshire Culture Trust

Graeme Thompson, Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of Sunderland

PRACTICAL

Wilkins Boardroom 

DEVELOPING A LEGACY PROGRAMME FROM SCRATCH: LESSONS FROM THE TALYLLYN RAILWAY

In turbulent times, cultural organisations need to develop long-term, sustainable sources of income. Giving through legacies is likely to grow considerably in forthcoming decades. Letting our audiences know that they can continue to support their passions long into the future through gifts in their wills can help grow our organisations' income, whilst enabling supporters to achieve important personal goals. Knowing that legacy giving is likely to be a future area of growth, the Talyllyn Railway decided in 2019 to invest in developing a more proactive approach to legacy fundraising. This session will describe the process that the Railway went through, from carrying out research among key stakeholders, to developing a case for support, to pulling together a legacy fundraising strategy. It will describe what the Railway learned along the way, and how other cultural organisations could develop their own approaches to this form of fundraising.

Dr Claire Routley, Consultant, Legacy Fundraising Ltd

Stuart Williams, General Manager, Talyllyn Railway

PRACTICAL

Conference Room 1

MEMBERSHIP SCHEMES: TO DO OR NOT TO DO...

Hear how Birmingham Royal Ballet and Kiln Theatre reconfigured their fundraising strategies to harness the support of their communities, developing two very different schemes specific to context, location, and history.

Catherine Walker, Individuals Fundraising Officer, Kiln Theatre

Fern Potter, Development Consultant, Birmingham Royal Ballet

Tessa Stanley-Price, Director of Fundraising, Kiln Theatre

13:00 LUNCH

14:00 THIRD BREAKOUT SESSION

Track

Session

Speakers

LANDSCAPE

Wilkins Boardroom

WHAT'S NEXT FOR YOUR LEGACY PROGRAMME?

Alongside the predicted growth in legacy income predicted to take place over the next few decades, interest in legacy fundraising is increasing across the cultural sector. Many organisations have taken the first steps in developing a legacy programme, refining their core messages, sharing stories in their newsletters and making information available to donors via their brochures or their websites.

However, once you have the basics in place, how do you grow and develop your programme? How might you become more proactive in your approach? How do you get engagement from trustees and senior staff? How do you engage your colleagues and, importantly, your volunteers? How do you steward your legacy audiences effectively?

In this session, a panel of experienced legacy fundraisers will share their thoughts and answer audience questions on how to grow a legacy programme beyond the basics.

Dr Claire Routley, Consultant, Legacy Fundraising Ltd

Gemma Rooke, Consultant, Gemma Rooke Fundraising & Consultancy & Training

Richard Radcliffe, Founder, Radcliffe Consulting

Valerie Harland, Consultant, Harland Fundraising

LANDSCAPE

National Dining Rooms

THE SLOW BOAT TO CHINA: FUNDRAISING FOR CHINA-RELATED CULTURAL PROJECTS

Based on the experience of running the Terracotta Warriors Exhibition Campaign at National Museums Liverpool in 2017-2018, Martin Kaufman, former Campaign Director, and Andrew Evans, former NML Director of Development, will give an exceptional overview of the lessons that anyone wanting to raise funds for Chinese cultural projects should bear in mind. The costs are high, but the benefits can be huge. There are internal and external risks, but also the potential for an enormous boost in visitor numbers, donor and sponsor engagement and community engagement. How can this be done with as few tears as possible? This will be a Chatham House Rules event.

Andrew Evans, Director, Think Philanthropy

Martin Kaufman, Principal, Martin Kaufman Philanthropy

PRACTICAL

Conference Room 1

THE ART OF IMPACT: STRENGTHENING MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION IN THE ARTS & CULTURAL SECTOR

There is no question that high quality stewardship is an essential component of any donor journey, and that in this age of strategic philanthropy, donors want to deeply understand the impact of their investments. That said – designing, measuring and communicating a compelling M&E framework can be extremely challenging for cultural charities whose outputs and outcomes are far less than tangible than those of their charitable peers. To explore this, and share expert recommendations for the cultural sector and beyond, this session features a panel discussion and Q&A with an experienced cultural fundraiser, a philanthropy advisor, and an M&E specialist. Attendees will walk away from this session with tangible recommendations on:
• Where to begin when developing an M&E framework
• How to communicate the unique impact of arts & culture organisations
• How to ensure all M&E approaches resonate strongly with supporters

Ian Thomas, Head of Evidence, Arts,  British Council

Rachel Stephenson Sheff, Philanthropy & Fundraising Advisor, I.G. Advisors and Lightful

PRACTICAL

Lecture Theatre

DIVERSIFYING INCOME IN A CHALLENGING FUNDING CLIMATE: FROM THE MULTI-MILLION POUND ENDOWMENT AT THE ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM TO CHANGING THE FUNDRAISING CULTURE AT STREETWISE OPERA, USING YOUR 'ASSETS' TO DEVELOP NEW INCOME STREAMS

How can arts and heritage organisations respond to the need to diversify income in an increasingly crowded and competitive market?

The world’s oldest surviving public museum, the Ashmolean, launched its endowment campaign in 2014 with an initial target of £25m, which was achieved 18 months ahead of schedule in 2018. This is almost unique within the cultural sector: whilst many organisations, like the Ashmolean, won HLF Catalyst: Endowment challenge grants, many recipients faced major challenges in raising endowment gifts and have now reverted to capital or programme-based campaigns. At Streetwise Opera, the charity had identified a need to move away from diminishing grant funding to establish a more diverse income mix. Despite being a small development team of two with few resources at their disposal, they increased income by 17% year-on-year, while at the same time developing a commercial strand, testing new events and improving donor engagement.

During this session, we will offer tips on planning and executing fundraising strategies and campaigns; gaining the buy-in of colleagues and senior stakeholders; using your assets to develop new income streams; and how to balance long-term financial security with immediate funding requirements.

Camille de Groote, Director of Development, Streetwise Opera

Francesca Hewitt, Director, Philanthropy Company

Frances Wheare, University of Oxford

 

PRACTICAL

Former Viewing Room

BUILDING YOUR DIGITAL FUNDRAISING ARSENAL

We know that the old adage is true - people give to people. So how do you maximise giving when some donors and prospects are engaging with you primarily via your digital channels? 

Chris Smith, Development Manager at Town Hall Symphony Hall, will open this session with a few quick and easy tools that will empower you to confidently communicate with your colleagues and web partners about all things digital. He’ll talk about the ways Town Hall Symphony Hall is exploiting digital avenues while also embedding fundraising throughout his organisation. 

Brooke Gallagher, Senior Account Manager at Spektrix, will then share with you some of the brilliant and inspiring approaches to giving that we have seen that are making the most of the opportunities out there.

You’ll probably have a very full brain by the time this session rocks around so we’re going to keep this brief and inspiring - just like you might want your donation asks to be - so that you walk away with a couple of ideas to explore once you get back to the office.

Chris Smith, Town Hall Symphony Hall

Brooke Gallagher, Spektrix

15:00 COFFEE AND NETWORKING 

15:30 FINAL BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Track

Session

Speakers

PORTRAIT

Wilkins Boardroom

MOVING INTO LEADERSHIP: HOW TO MAKE THE LEAP AT ANY STAGE OF YOUR CAREER

No matter how exciting it may be, moving ‘up a rung’ into more senior and leadership positions can also be daunting at every stage of your working life. Join three fundraisers at different points in their careers in education, wildlife and the arts to talk honestly about their journeys into leadership, including why they decided to make the move, the challenges they’ve encountered, and some top tips for navigating personal and corporate change whilst trying to preserve well-being. Attendees will come away with practical tools to help steer their move into a leadership role, as well as the confidence to reach out for support. There will also be plenty of time for questions and sharing of experiences from the audience.

Robin Peters, Theatre Manager, Strode Theatre

Rosie Oldham, Head of Fundraising, London Wildlife Trust

Sarah Gee, Managing Partner, Indigo and Chief Executive, Spitalfields Music

PORTRAIT

National Dining Rooms

WHAT DOES THE CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF FUNDRAISING MEAN FOR YOUR CAREER?

This session will brief delegates on where the Institute is at in its charter process. It will cover the implications of CPD being introduced so that delegates leave knowing that they will need to focus on their CPD to attain chartered fundraiser status to enhance their career in the future.

Alex Xavier, Director of Individual Membership, Compliance and Professional Development, Institute of Fundraising

LANDSCAPE

Former Viewing Room

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

For fundraising to be a diverse and equal profession, and in order for us to reach and engage with all potential supporters, we need fundraisers who represent all aspects of society across the UK. In this panel discussion, we bring together the IoF, Arts Council England and a leading grassroots collective to ask what action is needed to address existing inequalities and how we can deliver change.

Chair: Amanda Parker, Director of Inc Arts and Diversity and Inclusion Lead, Arts Fundraising and Philanthropy

Priya Changela, Disasters Emergency Committee

Abid Hussain, Director, Diversity, Arts Council England

Thanh Sinden, Chair, Museum Detox

PRACTICAL

Conference Room 1

EXTRAORDINARY STEWARDSHIP: CREATING A "CULTURE OF ENGAGEMENT"

Delivering extraordinary experiences of stewardship can be transformative in retaining and growing your philanthropic support base. In this practical session, you’ll hear case studies from Opera North and the Orpheus Centre about how both organisations are utilising their unique assets as arts organisations to meaningfully connect donors with artists and creatives to create a meaningful culture of engagement and philanthropy.

You’ll walk away from this session with tangible and creative ideas on how to deliver a unique and memorable donor journey that ensures return on investment and encourages the development of a long-term pipeline of support.

 

Jack Betteridge, Corporate Partnerships Fundraiser, The Orpheus Centre

Frankie Herman, Student at The Orpheus Centre

Moira Lambert, Director of Development, The Orpheus Centre

Natasha Morris, Corporate Partnerships Manager, Opera North

PRACTICAL

Lecture Theatre

DECISION SCIENCE & FUNDRAISING: LEARNINGS FROM THE UK'S LARGEST ARTS & CULTURAL FUNDRAISING EXPERIMENT

This session will share key findings from the largest arts fundraising experiment in Europe. You will hear case studies directly from three of the 11 participating organisations across the country, who will share the practical learnings and results from their experiments. You will leave this workshop with greater knowledge on how to embed the latest theories in decision science into your fundraising to yield greater results.

Bec Fearon, Head of Engagement, The Bluecoat

Dana Segal, Senior Partner Consultant, The Management Centre

Marina Jones, Head of Trusts and Foundations, Royal Opera House

Tom Dixon, Theatre Producer and Founding Member, The HandleBards


16:30 YOUNG PEOPLE, MONEY AND ACTIVISTS CLOSING PLENARY

Jess Bunyan, Development Manager, Rising Arts Agency

Elinor Lower, Creative Team Coordinator, Rising Arts Agency

Kamina Walton, Founder/Director, Rising Arts Agency

We, the young people of Rising, believe we have the knowledge and insight to be leaders now, not just in the future, with the potential to radically shift our cities and creative industries towards true cooperation and inclusion. Whoever gets the money has the power in the arts sector and as a genuinely youth-led organisation with 90% of our leadership and staff team under 30; we have put young people truly at the heart of that.

We're activists and advocates, making sure fundraising fits with our priorities and not the other way around. And it's working. In our first year our turnover was just £8k, and for 2019/20 and our total projected turnover is £334k - that's a 42 fold increase in 4 years. We'll show you how to co-design a fundraising approach with the people you're raising money for, how to integrate their voice and set the tone of your organisation for funders and sponsors without compromising what you believe in.

17:30 NETWORKING DRINKS AT ST MARTIN'S IN THE FIELD

 

Headline Sponsors: Spektrix

Spektrix logo

Partners: RAISE and Young Arts Fundraisers

RAISE and YAF

Bursary Sponsor: Tessitura Network

Tessitura Network

 Practical Strand Sponsor: Blackbaud

Blackbaud logo 2015